Philosophy (PHL)

PHL 101 -  Introduction to Philosophy  

Credit Hours: 3, Contact Hours: 3

Division: Humanities

Introduction to Philosophy is an introduction to some of the major areas, ideas, and thinkers of philosophy. Students will read selections from major philosophers in Western Philosophy, as well as texts representing non-traditional or non-Western sources, such as Native American, Asian and Feminist thought. Students will also be introduced to some of the main problems and concepts in areas such as Epistemology, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Aesthetics, as well as investigate other issues of movements, such as Existentialism or Feminism. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 105 -  Critical Thinking  

Credit Hours: 3, Contact Hours: 3

Division: Humanities

This course is about listening, reading, speaking, and writing more effectively. Students learn ways to assess information and to form sound evaluative judgments about what is seen, read, and heard. Critical questions provide a structure for critical thinking that supports a continuing search for better opinions, decisions, and judgments. Exercises in understanding and composing logically sound arguments are emphasized. Students learn what is fair and reasonable in an argument's structure. Examples are taken from various areas such as law, medicine, and politics, as well as from everyday life. Fallacies in rhetoric, such as name calling and begging the question, are identified and understood. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 121 -  Western Religions  

Credit Hours: 4, Contact Hours: 4

Division: Humanities

Western Religions is a study of the historical development, main religious teachings, leading personalities, ethical values, and worship practices of the major religious traditions of the western world: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 122 -  Eastern Religions  

Credit Hours: 4, Contact Hours: 4

Division: Humanities

Eastern Religions is a study of the historical development, main religious teachings, leading personalities, ethical values, and worship practices of the major religious traditions of India, China, and Japan: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 201 -  Ethics  

Credit Hours: 3, Contact Hours: 3

Division: Humanities

Ethics is a thoughtful analysis of a variety of value systems found in societies today. It explores the nature and meaning of good and evil and how these concepts relate to concepts of right and wrong. Through the use of critical judgment and philosophical thought, the course explores ethical theories from classical to modern times and includes consideration of ethics that are part of Eastern philosophical traditions as well as sources from other non-traditional frameworks and paradigms. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 202 -  Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas  

Credit Hours: 3, Contact Hours: 3

Division: Humanities

Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas examines the moral and ethical issues confronting modern societies locally and globally. Possible topics to be examined may include: the natural environment, the ethical treatment of animals, biomedical ethics; abortion and issues of human reproduction such as stem-cell research and cloning; business ethics; criminal justice and capital punishment; racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination, welfare and economics distribution. This course relies on the discipline of philosophy for its methods of inquiry with critical thinking serving as a guiding concept. Traditional approaches to ethics will be incorporated throughout the course. Eastern/Asian and Native American philosophy may also be considered for contrast with standard western approaches to ethical and social issues. This course considers various topics and specific cases in order to provide an overall view of how ethical reasoning might be applied to current issues. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111

PHL 203 -  Environmental Ethics  

Credit Hours: 3, Contact Hours: 3

Division: Humanities

Environmental Ethics is an introduction to the major approaches to environmental ethics, including anthropocentrism, biocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminisim, as well as several others based on both Western and non-western philosophical and religious traditions. Since environmental ethics draws on a variety of disciplines, some of the perspectives presented will draw heavily on scientific arguments which emphasize methods based on reason, logic, objectivity, and repeatability. Other perspectives will draw on intuition, emotion, imagination, artistic, historic, and religious views, as well as everyday experience. A variety of perspectives will be examined for the purpose of both forming and informing one's own environmental ethic. Group 1 course. Communications - Direct, Critical Thinking - Direct, Degree Req:Cultural Persp/Div, Infused: Writing Intensive.

Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 11/111 or placement into ENG 111.

PHL 293 -  Philosophy Study Abroad  

Credit Hours: 1, Contact Hours: 1

Division: Humanities

In this class, students are provided the opportunity to travel to a specified destination affiliated with the corresponding philosophy non-trip course. This course will serve to integrate the student learning experience and provide a sense of cultural perspective, diversity and regional awareness. The course is an opportunity for students to explore other areas around the world while applying discipline-specific course content. For a more specific course description, please review the course description of the associated non-trip course. Group 2 course.

Required Prerequisites: PHL 121, or PHL 122